Top 10 No Pull Dog Harness Options

Our top 10 force-free, no pull dog harness picks for happy pups and people.

Let’s face it, walking a dog that pulls is no fun – not to mention it’s unsafe! Luckily for us there are a range of specialty harnesses on the market designed specifically for pullers, and when used and fitted correctly, drastically improve the quality (and safety) of walks for all involved. Check out our top 10 no pull dog harness picks below!

Image via Kurgo feat. the Tru-Fit Smart Harness

 

Why do dogs pull on the leash?

Dogs pull for a variety of reasons and understanding why your dog pulls is key to finding a solution that works for you and your pooch.

Some of the main reasons that dogs pull on the leash include;

    • It’s a learned behavior – they’ve learnt that when they pull it makes you move forward and take them to where they want to go – at their pace no less! By allowing them to pull, you are rewarding this behavior.
    • Lack of training and impulse control – Walking in a straight line is not natural for a dog, they need to be taught acceptable on-leash behavior through dedicated and consistent training,  including impulse control while on-leash – it’s for their own safety, and yours.
    • They move faster than we do – a leisurely stroll at human pace isn’t really ‘exercise’ for a dog (although it does have its health benefits). Dogs like to move much quicker than us!
    • Lack of physical and mental exercise – this leads to excess energy, over-stimulation and a lack of focus at walk time, which makes it near impossible to train or walk a dog ‘nicely’ on the leash. Try to expel some of the pent-up energy before venturing out on a walk (i.e. through physical games and enrichment activities).
    • Oppositional reflex – this is your dog’s natural instinct to resist pressure.
    • Fear/anxiety – pulling on the leash might be your dog’s ‘flight’ response to an anxiety trigger or fearful situation. If this is the case, consider working with a behaviorist to determine what might be triggering your dog in the first place and devise a plan to overcome it.

How to stop your dog pulling

If relaxed, loose-leash walking is your goal (and it should be!), teaching your dog appropriate on-leash behavior is an absolute must… not only for both of your safety, but for your sanity too!

Some helpful training guidelines;

  • Train your dog in a quiet, distraction-free area to give them the best chance of success.
  • Start training as young as possible and make sure you are consistent.
  • Keep training sessions short (but regular) to keep them interested.
  • Make training an enjoyable and rewarding experience for your dog.
  • If your dog is food-motivated, don’t forget to bring treats!
  • Give your dog plenty of opportunities for mental and physical daily exercise (in turn they’ll be calmer, have less energy to burn and be more focused during training sessions).
  • Don’t forget to give your dog safe, supervised, off-leash opportunities where they are free to indulge their natural doggy instincts – it’ll do wonders for their mental health and well-being as well as make training easier.
  • Teach your pup the “heel” or “walking” command so they know when they’re supposed to be walking nicely. Always have a release word like “OK” or “free” so they know when training is over and they’re free to play. A clearly defined start and finish is important.
  • Invest in the right equipment – for some dogs a simple flat collar and leash set will do just fine, for those that are a little more challenging to work with, investing in a dedicated no pull dog harness for training purposes can work wonders. Check out our top 10 picks below!

For some technique-specific loose-leash walking tips, be sure to check out this great read from ‘Positively – Victoria Stillwell’.

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Top 10 No Pull Dog Harness Options

While there is no substitute for dedicated and consistent training, many canine behaviorists and trainers recommend the use of a front-attach (or ‘chest-led’) harness for dogs that pull as they discourage pulling in a force-free way, giving gentle control back to the owner.

Most dogs take to wearing front-attach harnesses fairly quickly too, which is sometimes the opposite for other types of anti-pull devices (i.e. haltis and head collars).

When fitted correctly and when worn only when necessary (for walks and training purposes only), a front-attach harness can be a useful training tool when teaching your dog to walk nicely on the leash.

Important –  Always ensure your dog’s harness is fitted correctly and follow manufacturer guidelines, as improper and/or prolonged use may contribute to or predispose your dog to repetitive strain associated injuries.

Without further ado (and in no particular order), here are our top 10 no pull dog harness picks!

Key features:

  • Martingale chest loop with leash clip
  • Durable nylon construction
  • High-visibility reflective strips
  • Light, breathable coverage
  • Easy-fit with multiple adjustment points
  • Neoprene padding
  • 4 sizes to choose from
  • 4 color options

Key features:

  • Front and back leash clip options
  • 6 adjustment points for the perfect fit
  • Does not restrict motion or mobility
  • Y-neck design does not rub shoulders
  • Light, breathable coverage
  • 5 sizes to choose from
  • 8 color options

Key features:

  • Front and back leash clip options
  • Padded chest with breathable mesh
  • V-neck design for easy movement
  • 4 adjustment points
  • Reflective trim
  • Includes back handle
  • 5 sizes to choose from
  • 3 color options

Key features:

  • Front leash clip option
  • Rear martingale leash clip option
  • Nylon webbing with velvet lined chest strap
  • 4 adjustment points
  • Dual connection leash included
  • Chewing replacement warranty included
  • 7 sizes to choose from
  • 19 color options

Key features:

  • Martingale chest loop with leash clip
  • Durable nylon construction
  • Light, breathable coverage
  • Easy-fit with 4 adjustment points
  • 1 year chew damage replacement
  • 8 sizes to choose from
  • 8 color options

Key features:

  • Front and back leash attachment options
  • 5 adjustment points for the perfect fit
  • Durable nylon construction
  • Padded chest plate
  • Seat belt restraint/training tether included
  • 5 sizes to choose from
  • 3 color options

Key features:

  • Front and back leash attachment options
  • Front leash attachment includes martingale loop
  • 5 adjustment points for the perfect fit
  • Durable nylon construction with padded straps
  • Reflective stitching
  • Built-in seat belt/control handle
  • 4 sizes to choose from
  • 3 color options

Image via Rabitgoo/Amazon.

Key features:

  • Front and back leash attachment options
  • Breathable mesh padded chest/back plates
  • 4 adjustment points
  • Durable nylon construction with reflective strips
  • Control handle
  • Budget-friendly
  • 4 sizes to choose from
  • 11 color options

Image via PoyPet/Amazon.

Key features:

  • Front and back leash attachment options
  • Breathable mesh padded chest/back plates
  • 3 buckle fitting system
  • 4 adjustable straps
  • High visibility reflective strips and piping
  • Soft padded control handle
  • 5 sizes to choose from
  • 16 color options

Image via Eagloo/Amazon.

Key features:

  • Front and back leash attachment options
  • Breathable mesh padded chest/back plates
  • 4 adjustment points
  • High visibility reflective strips
  • Control handle
  • Budget-friendly
  • 4 sizes to choose from
  • 9 color options
Top 10 No Pull Dog Harness Options - stop dog pulling, force-free training, no pull dog harnesses, anti-pull dog harness.
Top 10 No Pull Dog Harness Options - feat. brands such as PetSafe, Kurgo, 2 Hounds Design, Blue-9 and more. Force-free dog training tools. Anti-pull dog harnesses.

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